thelovelyseas:

Eye by Mathieu Foulquié

thelovelyseas:

Eye by 


246 notes | Reblog | 2 months ago
latimes:

Los Angeles: Say goodbye to plastic bags
Starting with the new year, plastic bags will be banned from major grocery markets, with smaller stores to be forced to give up the bags starting in July. So L.A. residents be warned: Tomorrow is your last chance to have your groceries bagged in plastic in compliance with the law.
Unless, of course, your grocer of choice just decides to hand you a plastic bag anyway.
Read more on the upcoming ban right here.
Photo: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

latimes:

Los Angeles: Say goodbye to plastic bags

Starting with the new year, plastic bags will be banned from major grocery markets, with smaller stores to be forced to give up the bags starting in July. So L.A. residents be warned: Tomorrow is your last chance to have your groceries bagged in plastic in compliance with the law.

Unless, of course, your grocer of choice just decides to hand you a plastic bag anyway.

Read more on the upcoming ban right here.

Photo: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times


350 notes | Reblog | 3 months ago
thelovelyseas:

Green Turtle eating Jellyfish - Dimakya Island, Philippines by Ai Angel Gentel

thelovelyseas:

Green Turtle eating Jellyfish - Dimakya Island, Philippines by Ai Angel Gentel


1,012 notes | Reblog | 4 months ago

chetsingh asked: love the site, very inspiring

Thank you! Thanks for reading. :)


waffleguppies:

MEET THE BIGFIN SQUID.

Did not know these existed ‘til just now. Magapinna are different from most squid. They have elbows. They have huge fins, up to 90% the size of their mantle. They have elastic tentacles which can stretch to 15-20 times the mantle length. They live at a depth of more than 7,000 feet below the surface.

They seem to live mostly in the Gulf of Mexico. We aren’t sure what they eat.


2,368 notes | Reblog | 4 months ago

rhamphotheca:

Hatfield Marine Science Center:

Sashay the Pacific Giant Octopus Gets Released

Sashay, our stunning and extremely friendly Visitor Center octopus was released back into the wild on November 26th. After being gently introduced into the Yaquina Bay, she temporarily crawled onto land. This gave her human fans a final opportunity to say goodbye.

This type of behavior has not been seen at any of our previous releases and was an unforgettable moment for all who witnessed it. While it was difficult to bid this beautiful animal adieu, we want our octopuses to have the opportunity to reproduce and finish their lives in the wild. We hope you enjoy these photos!

Photos by Volunteer James Upton


10,299 notes | Reblog | 4 months ago

Long-term warming and environmental change trends persist in the Arctic in 2013

According to a new report released today by NOAA and its partners, cooler temperatures in the summer of 2013 across the central Arctic Ocean, Greenland and northern Canada moderated the record sea ice loss and extensive melting that the surface of the Greenland ice sheet experienced last year. Yet there continued to be regional extremes, including record low May snow cover in Eurasia and record high summer temperatures in Alaska.

“The Arctic caught a bit of a break in 2013 from the recent string of record-breaking warmth and ice melt of the last decade,” said David M. Kennedy, NOAA’s deputy under secretary for operations, during a press briefing today at the American Geophysical Union annual meeting in San Francisco. “But the relatively cool year in some parts of the Arctic does little to offset the long-term trend of the last 30 years: the Arctic is warming rapidly, becoming greener and experiencing a variety of changes, affecting people, the physical environment, and marine and land ecosystems.”

Kennedy joined other scientists to release the Arctic Report Card 2013, which has, since 2006, summarized changing conditions in the Arctic. One hundred forty-seven authors from 14 countries contributed to the peer-reviewed report. 


1 note | Reblog | 4 months ago

jtotheizzoe:

What if all the ice melted?

The ocean holds most of Earth’s water. After that, it’s ice. 5.7 million cubic miles of the stuff.

What if, thanks to natural and man-made climate change, it all melted? What if, by burning enough deep-Earth carbon (dead dinosaurs, prehistoric plants, or as we call it… fossil fuels) we raised Earth’s average temperature to around 80˚ F?

Thanks to National Geographic we know: This is is what 216 feet (66 meters) of sea level change looks like. 


3,838 notes | Reblog | 4 months ago
griseus:

NEW DEEP-SEA ANIMALS RECENTLY DISCOVERED

More than 30 new, and as yet unclassified, species of marine life have been discovered in Antarctica’s deep Amundsen Sea. The bottom-dwelling species were collected during a 2008 survey, but the results have just been published. 

More: Nat Geo News
Reference: Linse et al, 2013. The macro- and megabenthic fauna on the continental shelf of the eastern Amundsen Sea, Antarctica. Continental Shelf Research 

griseus:

NEW DEEP-SEA ANIMALS RECENTLY DISCOVERED

More than 30 new, and as yet unclassified, species of marine life have been discovered in Antarctica’s deep Amundsen Sea. The bottom-dwelling species were collected during a 2008 survey, but the results have just been published. 


239 notes | Reblog | 4 months ago

Making a Bodacious Dream Come True


awkwardsituationist:

elephants silhouetted by the darkening shades of the golden hour on the african savannah, by dana allensusan mcconnell, nevil lazarus, chris packham, andy rouse and frans lanting


34,390 notes | Reblog | 4 months ago
jhameia:

beardybeardy:

(via No more citations for curbside veggies in Los Angeles)
“Planting a vegetable garden beside a road is no longer a fineable action in Los Angeles.
In a major victory for TED speaker Ron Finley, otherwise known as the renegade gardener of South Central, the Los Angeles City Council voted 15-0 on Tuesday to allow the planting of vegetable gardens in unused strips of city land by roads. The council is opting to waive the enforcement of a city law that requires sidewalks and curbs to be “free of obstruction” in the case of vegetable gardens designed for community use. The city will stop enforcing this law immediately.
On the TED2013 stage, Finley described getting a citation for planting a vegetable garden on his curb.
“I live in a food desert, South Central Los Angeles, home of the drive-thru and the drive-by,” he said. “So what I did, I planted a food forest in front of my house. It was on a strip of land called a parkway. It’s 150 feet by 10 feet. Thing is, it’s owned by the city. And somebody complained. The city came down on me, and basically gave me a citation saying that I had to remove my garden, and the citation was turning into a warrant. And I’m like ‘Come on, really? A warrant for planting food on a piece of land that you could care less about?’”
After getting the citation, Finley circulated a petition. And the number of signatures he collected made an impact on Council President Herb Wesson. Last week, after two more urban gardeners were issued citations, Wesson raised the motion to amend the ”Residential Parkway Landscaping Guidelines” and stop fining for vegetable gardens. Many of his fellow council members agreed. As councilman Mike Bonin put it to the Los Angeles Daily News, “We deal with a lot of big issues, but this is one that helps shape community character.”
Finley himself was very happy with the change, and that he got a personal shout-out during the council session. ”I was pretty elated. It’s beautiful,” he tells the TED Blog. “It goes to show that one person can make a difference.”
His next battle: pushing for more vacant lots to be turned into community vegetable gardens, so people can learn the self-sufficiency of growing their own food. “It shouldn’t be abnormal,” says Finley.

YAY!

jhameia:

beardybeardy:

(via No more citations for curbside veggies in Los Angeles)

Planting a vegetable garden beside a road is no longer a fineable action in Los Angeles.

In a major victory for TED speaker Ron Finley, otherwise known as the renegade gardener of South Central, the Los Angeles City Council voted 15-0 on Tuesday to allow the planting of vegetable gardens in unused strips of city land by roads. The council is opting to waive the enforcement of a city law that requires sidewalks and curbs to be “free of obstruction” in the case of vegetable gardens designed for community use. The city will stop enforcing this law immediately.

On the TED2013 stage, Finley described getting a citation for planting a vegetable garden on his curb.

“I live in a food desert, South Central Los Angeles, home of the drive-thru and the drive-by,” he said. “So what I did, I planted a food forest in front of my house. It was on a strip of land called a parkway. It’s 150 feet by 10 feet. Thing is, it’s owned by the city. And somebody complained. The city came down on me, and basically gave me a citation saying that I had to remove my garden, and the citation was turning into a warrant. And I’m like ‘Come on, really? A warrant for planting food on a piece of land that you could care less about?’”

After getting the citation, Finley circulated a petition. And the number of signatures he collected made an impact on Council President Herb Wesson. Last week, after two more urban gardeners were issued citations, Wesson raised the motion to amend the ”Residential Parkway Landscaping Guidelines” and stop fining for vegetable gardens. Many of his fellow council members agreed. As councilman Mike Bonin put it to the Los Angeles Daily News, “We deal with a lot of big issues, but this is one that helps shape community character.”

Finley himself was very happy with the change, and that he got a personal shout-out during the council session. ”I was pretty elated. It’s beautiful,” he tells the TED Blog. “It goes to show that one person can make a difference.”

His next battle: pushing for more vacant lots to be turned into community vegetable gardens, so people can learn the self-sufficiency of growing their own food. “It shouldn’t be abnormal,” says Finley.

YAY!


3,985 notes | Reblog | 6 months ago
laboratoryequipment:

Survey Vessel Caused Mass Whale StrandingAn independent scientific review panel has concluded that the mass stranding of approximately 100 melon-headed whales in the Loza Lagoon system in northwest Madagascar in 2008 was primarily triggered by acoustic stimuli, more specifically, a multi-beam echosounder system operated by a survey vessel contracted by ExxonMobil Exploration and Production (Northern Madagascar) Limited.In response to the event and with assistance from Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) led an international stranding team to help return live whales from the lagoon system to the open sea, and to conduct necropsies on dead whales to determine the cause of death.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/survey-vessel-caused-whale-mass-stranding

laboratoryequipment:

Survey Vessel Caused Mass Whale Stranding

An independent scientific review panel has concluded that the mass stranding of approximately 100 melon-headed whales in the Loza Lagoon system in northwest Madagascar in 2008 was primarily triggered by acoustic stimuli, more specifically, a multi-beam echosounder system operated by a survey vessel contracted by ExxonMobil Exploration and Production (Northern Madagascar) Limited.

In response to the event and with assistance from Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) led an international stranding team to help return live whales from the lagoon system to the open sea, and to conduct necropsies on dead whales to determine the cause of death.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/survey-vessel-caused-whale-mass-stranding


20 notes | Reblog | 6 months ago
laboratoryequipment:

Reusable, Magnetic Nanoparticles Remove Clean Oil SpillsWhen 4.9 million barrels of crude oil spewed into the Gulf of Mexico following the April 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig disaster, cleanup crews rushed to deploy floating barriers to contain crude oil collecting on the water’s surface. However, this did nothing for the oil that never reached the top.Crews released more than two million gallons of an experimental dispersant, Corexit, to break up the underwater oil and prevent it from reaching coast lines. Still, tar balls washed up on beaches lining the Gulf Coast and mixed in with the sandy ocean floor. Corexit didn’t remove oil. It only broke it down so that the environment could handle the tiny droplets of dispersed oil. But Corexit may have made the oil more toxic, and killed microscopic marine animals at the bottom of the Gulf, one study found.Now, researchers at Texas A&M Univ., have developed a non-toxic solution to clean up residual crude oil after bulk removal following a spill. They’ve designed nanoparticles that soak up underwater oil like millions of tiny sponges and remove it from the environment. Each “nanosponge” is 100 times thinner than a human hair and can hold more than 10 times its own weight in oil. The particles can be removed from the water after absorption and reused after the oil is removed.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/reusable-magnetic-nanoparticles-remove-clean-oil-spills

laboratoryequipment:

Reusable, Magnetic Nanoparticles Remove Clean Oil Spills

When 4.9 million barrels of crude oil spewed into the Gulf of Mexico following the April 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig disaster, cleanup crews rushed to deploy floating barriers to contain crude oil collecting on the water’s surface. However, this did nothing for the oil that never reached the top.

Crews released more than two million gallons of an experimental dispersant, Corexit, to break up the underwater oil and prevent it from reaching coast lines. Still, tar balls washed up on beaches lining the Gulf Coast and mixed in with the sandy ocean floor. Corexit didn’t remove oil. It only broke it down so that the environment could handle the tiny droplets of dispersed oil. But Corexit may have made the oil more toxic, and killed microscopic marine animals at the bottom of the Gulf, one study found.

Now, researchers at Texas A&M Univ., have developed a non-toxic solution to clean up residual crude oil after bulk removal following a spill. They’ve designed nanoparticles that soak up underwater oil like millions of tiny sponges and remove it from the environment. Each “nanosponge” is 100 times thinner than a human hair and can hold more than 10 times its own weight in oil. The particles can be removed from the water after absorption and reused after the oil is removed.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/reusable-magnetic-nanoparticles-remove-clean-oil-spills


33 notes | Reblog | 6 months ago
laboratoryequipment:

Arctic Sea Ice is Sixth Lowest, But Better than 2012The amount of ice in the Arctic Ocean shrank this summer to the sixth lowest level, but that’s much higher than last year’s record low.The ice cap at the North Pole melts in the summer and grows in winter; its general shrinking trend is a sign of global warming. The National Snow and Ice Data Center says that Arctic ice was at 1.97 million square miles when it stopped melting late last week.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/arctic-sea-ice-sixth-lowest-better-2012

laboratoryequipment:

Arctic Sea Ice is Sixth Lowest, But Better than 2012

The amount of ice in the Arctic Ocean shrank this summer to the sixth lowest level, but that’s much higher than last year’s record low.

The ice cap at the North Pole melts in the summer and grows in winter; its general shrinking trend is a sign of global warming. The National Snow and Ice Data Center says that Arctic ice was at 1.97 million square miles when it stopped melting late last week.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2013/09/arctic-sea-ice-sixth-lowest-better-2012


18 notes | Reblog | 7 months ago
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